6 cheap Ways to Block Heat from Windows. The Ultimate Guide

The summer season is now in full swing and people are looking for ways to block the heat from entering their house through the window. There are many cheap solutions that can be done with items lying around your house or at a hardware store. In this blog post, we will go over 10 of these solutions so you can block out those hot days!

How does heat get into a house through the window?

Heat enters a house through the window due to conduction and radiation. Conduction occurs when there is an uneven distribution of temperature, which causes heat loss from one object or surface to another that’s at a different temperature. In short, it can be described as touching something hot with your bare hand (or some other material) and feeling its heat. The second cause, radiation, is the transfer of heat by electromagnetic waves from one object to another without physical contact.

Heat loss can be prevented through blockage with insulation or blockages that are filled in gaps around windows and doors. These blockages will help keep the cold air out while still allowing some airflow for ventilation purposes. In addition, these blockages will also reduce noise pollution because there’s less outside sound getting into your house!

How does heat get into a house through the window?
  1. Use a block of Styrofoam insulation to block the window from heat loss.
  2. Pack your windows with newspaper and add a layer or two in between for an extra barrier against heat transfer.
  3. To block sound, hang thick curtains that are heavy enough so they don’t blow around too much when there’s wind.

Cheap ways to block heat from windows

1. Heat Blocking Window Shades

Heat Blocking Window Shades to block heat from windows

Heat block window shades are an easy and cheap way to block heat from windows. You can buy these just about anywhere or you could make your own following this tutorial on how to make a DIY block shade with fabric, some weights, and clothespins. These block out the light too so it’s perfect for when you want privacy without losing any light.

Buy a simple plastic sheet that is opaque enough not to let in much natural sunlight but has air pockets that allow ventilation “fog” through it (these are found at hardware stores). The fog will dissipate quickly once inside the house because of all the trapped cold air beneath it! This idea works well if there’s no need for sound blocking as well since the block will be too thick to see and hear out of the window.

Read also: Insulating Windows: The Secrets to Keeping Your House Warm in the Winter

2. Use Blockout Roller or Panel Blinds

Blockout Roller or Panel Blinds to block heat from windows

Blockout roller or panel blinds are a great block against heat transfer because they block out all light. These blockages can also be found at hardware stores and like the plastic sheet, it’s cheap to purchase! The downsides of these blockades include being unable to see through them when you’re outside so privacy is lacking.

3. Use heavy curtains in front of windows

Heavy curtains block out all light and heat transfer through windows. This can be expensive for those who need to block sound unless the curtains are thick enough that they don’t blow around too much when there’s wind (which is unlikely).

heavy curtains in front of windows

-If you’re looking for something cheaper, cutting up sheets of heavy fabric or using an old blanket would work! These blockages will also block some outside noise which makes it a great solution if you want both privacy and reduced sound pollution.

Hang heavy curtains in front of windows before bedtime for an insulation layer that will keep cold air from coming into your house during the nighttime hours. It’ll help with blocking sound too if there isn’t much wind blowing around while you sleep (which would make any noise more noticeable). You could use this method on its own without using anything else mentioned here for some added relief!

4. Use Bubble Wrap Window Insulation

Bubble wrap is a cheap blockage for windows that can be used on its own or with other blockages. You could use bubble wrap as an insulation layer behind another block of insulation to help keep heat in and cold air out (or you could just buy some from the hardware store).

Use Bubble Wrap Window Insulation

-Simply cut it down to size, tape it along the edges so there are no gaps in between them, then set up your window frame around it!

-In addition, this block will also reduce sound pollution because bubbles act as little sound proofers which muffle noise.

-Alternatively, you may want to have clear plastic sheeting below the bubble wrap for extra protection against heat loss since it doesn’t leave any holes where cold air can seep in.

-Alternatively, you may want to block out sound as well if there’s a need for that and use this blockage with the plastic sheeting below it so you don’t have any gaps between them!

Bubble wrap is also great because it won’t let light through from outside which means privacy.

5. Use Heat Reducing Window Film

Use Heat Reducing Window Film

Heat-reducing window film is a blockage that will block out all light and heat transfer from outside. It’s a great block for noise pollution as well since it doesn’t allow sound to penetrate through the windows while also blocking harmful UV rays.

-You can purchase this type of block at hardware stores, but be sure to get enough so you’ll have some extra in case you need them!

-When applying heat-reducing window films, make sure they’re applied with no gaps between being completely sealed on both sides with tape or adhesive sheets (you may want gloves if your hands are sensitive). This block does not come cheap because there are installation fees involved which means you should only use it if privacy isn’t an issue and saving money is a priority.

Heat-reducing window films block out all light and way heat transfer from outside while also preventing UV rays from coming in which helps with blocking sound pollution too because it doesn’t allow sound to penetrate through the windows.

6. Combining Multiple Methods of blocking windows from heat

There are many blockages for windows that you could use on their own or together. Combining blockages will provide better insulation than just one block at a time if the goal is to keep the heat outside and cold air out!

-For example, bubble wrap blocks noise as well so it’s not recommended to have extra plastic sheeting below it (since there would be no gaps between them). You can still combine these blockages by using adhesive tape to seal off any spaces in between where they touch but ideally this should only be done with other block methods like heavy curtains because of the sound barrier provided by bubbles.

Combine multiple block window methods for maximum protection against both sound pollution and unwanted heat transfer into your house! You can block out sound with bubble wrap and block heat from exiting your house using heavy curtains, for example.

-An adhesive tape will be necessary to seal off any gaps in between where the blockages touch or are attached together (if you’re looking to block both sound pollution as well as block heat).

Can aluminum foil block heat from windows?

Can aluminum foil block heat from wi

Yes, aluminum foil can block heat from windows.

-You’ll want to have a layer of bubble wrap underneath the aluminum foil so you don’t see any light or sound gaps that could come in! Aluminum foil is also better for blocking out UV rays than other blockages since it doesn’t allow them through and will help keep the inside temperature cooler too!

Aluminum foils block out all light transfers coming from outside (especially if there’s a layer of bubbles below it) while also preventing harmful UV rays from coming in which helps with lowering room temperatures as well because no cold air gets inside when combined with this blockage.

Will placing cardboard on windows keep heat out?

Will placing cardboard on windows keep heat out?

Put simply,  not very effective. The cardboard has air pockets. Cardboard will not block heat from windows because it is porous and allows air to flow through them.

Cardboard does not block heat from coming in or out of your house, so don’t waste time using this blockage if you’re looking for a way to save money on window insulation!

-If the goal isn’t just to keep cold outside but also prevent sound intrusion as well then try something like bubble wrap instead–cardboards are very thin which means they allow noise transfer pretty easily through them. This block can help with privacy though since light won’t be able to go through either.

-Cardboard is good for blocking sound though which is helpful if you just want the inside of your house to be quiet and need an inexpensive block that can do so! So it’s a blockage option but one that should only be used in combination with other blockages like plastic sheeting or bubble wrap because they don’t block UV rays at all (cardboards do) and won’t help keep the cold out either.

Placing cardboard on window sills would provide no insulation against heat transfer coming in from outside since this block doesn’t work well against light transfers or keeps cool air from escaping through cracks when combined with heavy curtains. Cardboards are better for insulating sound.

Conclusion

There are many blockages for windows that you could use on their own or together. Combining blockages will provide better insulation than just one block at a time if the goal is to keep the heat outside and cold air out!

-For example, bubble wrap blocks noise as well so it’s not recommended to have extra plastic sheeting below it (since there would be no gaps between them). You can still combine these blockages by using adhesive tape to seal off any spaces in between where they touch but ideally this should only be done with other block methods like heavy curtains because of the sound barrier provided by bubbles.

Combine multiple block window methods for maximum protection against both sound pollution and unwanted heat transfer into your house!

-Use a heavy fabric that is opaque enough not to let in much natural sunlight but has air pockets or gaps that allow ventilation “fog” through it (these are found at hardware stores). The fog will dissipate quickly once inside the house because of all the

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